Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
. that takes a few months. medina are spending urges it is far from 70,000 shrimp farms -- land overs have displaced lots of owners. farmers take out loans to police the land it. there is that -- if they can be deskilled, and frozen for shipment. this is the hardest for me to document. there is the processing plants. i was taken away at small got -- smog gunpoint. i was violently taken away. that one is ok. the wages were low. there was no severe labor going on. i could not quantify so much of it was tainted. in net interest in the supply chain, i was able to quantify the ratio of shrimp around the world. that was one out of the 57 schrempp. i do not know the forced labor component. he will go lower will ask china to do the same kind of study. i cannot emphasize. what does that mean? every american eats what have and three pieces of shrimp a year attainted. that is what it meant to address global supply chains. this is the work done around to the world now to be a part of this entry is the supply chains. it is an important if we will tackle slavery. one final exercise i always go over on m
it and that is kate medina and london king and all of these ferocious women at random house. i am grateful to them. [applause] i also have to say that this book would not be possible without two other extraordinary women. they are my translators for this project and they risked more than i did to tell the stories. finally, i'm grateful to the courage of the people who allow their stories to be told. if this means anything, i think it's this. that small stories in so-called places matter and one of the reasons that they matter i think is because, because they implicate and they complicate what we generally consider to be the larger story in this country which is, and throughout the world which is the peoples who do have political and economic power. i would just like to remember anthony shadid who was one of those great believers in small stories and we miss him badly and thank you. [applause] [applause] >> i i love it when writers are at a loss for words. they are still eloquent. to present the 2012 national book award for fiction is lori moore. lori moore is the author of three story collections
to do it, and that's binky urban and kate medina and london king and all these ferocious women at random house. and i am grateful to them. [applause] i also have to say that this book would not be possible without two other extraordinary women which are they're -- [inaudible] who are my translators on this project and who risked more than i did to tell these stories. and finally i am grateful to the courage of the people who allowed their stories to be told. and if this prize, um, means anything, i think it's this: it's that small stories in so-called hidden places matter. and one of the reasons that they matter, i think, is because, because they implicate and they complicate what we generally consider to be the larger story in this country which is, you know, and throughout the world which is the story of people who do have political and economic power. and, um, i'd just like to remember anthony shadid who was one of those great believers in small stories, and we miss him badly and thank you. [applause] >> i love that when writers are at a loss of words, they are still eloquent. to pres
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3